Quiet Time

Duration: any

Age: baby, toddler, child, parent

Skill for Bub: Mind Builder

summary:

A special way to teach your child about the four different times of the year.

From birth, most babies are bombarded with sounds and stimulation throughout the day. Rattles are shaken, toys hum and talk, songs are sung and games are played. Quiet time is often overlooked. But before you know it, your child will have to know how to sit quietly at preschool, church or other social function. Being quiet helps children really think and learn more about what’s around them. Here’s how to carve out quiet time:

  • Find a time when your baby is relaxed, such as after lunch or before a nap.
  • Set aside a block of time, such as 15 to 30 minutes, where your child can just be quiet.
  • Read a favorite book in a rocking chair.
  • Play a CD of soft songs, such as yoga music, ocean sounds or lullabies.
  • Lay with your baby on a blanket and watch the ceiling fan.
  • Look at your baby in the eyes and just smile at each other for a while. Have a staring contest!
  • Make sure there’s minimal talking, singing or humming. The key is to hear the quiet.
  • Ask your child what he hears in the silence. Is that the clock ticking? Is the cat purring? Is that the neighbor’s dog barking? Who is mowing their lawn? It’s amazing what you can hear when you just stop and listen!

As your child grows, this time can be used to expand his mind and help with creative and intellectual thinking.

  • As your child grows, this time can be used to expand his mind and help with creative and intellectual thinking.
  • Have him visualize himself doing certain things, like helping a friend, cleaning his room or following directions.
  • Have him visualize the story read to him at bedtime the night before.
  • To further expand this idea, give him a sheet of paper and have him draw what he saw in his mind.